A More Perfect Union

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A More Perfect Union

Post by Mergerberger on Wed Aug 03, 2016 1:31 am

We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their creator with certain inalienable rights, and among these are life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.

A man sat back at his desk. He was to write a new Declaration of Independence, but could not think of a better introduction than the one he held so close to his heart. He longed for the simpler days of the United States, when there was a clear government ruling over everything from Maine to the Philippines, and protecting the Americas from foreign intrusions. He sipped his whiskey, sighed heavily, and sat back up in his chair and continued his useless attempt to best the founding fathers of the United States at writing.

But he could not. Besides, this country was to be the successor state to the old United States, so why should its declaration of independence be any different? He would bring this up at the convention. He looked at his watch, and realized he only had seventeen minutes to walk the two miles to where the secret conference of delegates from thirteen states were waiting. He gathered his things hastily and left his small apartment.

He arrived ten minutes after the conference was set to begin. It clearly had not, since there was much mindless chatter about women, money, and other non-political things. When the other delegates saw him, they fell silent, turned to face him, and each saluted him, whether with a formal military salute or with a "Mr. Vanderbilt" said in a low voice. He plodded up to the front of the room, where a desk sat facing the rest of the delegates. He set his materials upon it, disorganized though he was. After taking a moment to ensure everything was there, he moved to the podium, to address the room.

"It has come to my atten-" he stopped to clear his throat, and while he was doing this he decided also to change his tone, "I realized something this morning," he said, leaning forward on the podium so the blood could return to his legs, "I realized that, if we want to truly be the successor state to the United States, then we must adopt the Constitution as the basis for our government. After all, did it not work for the United States for nearly two centuries?"

"The United States fell apart, if you remember," said a delegate from Ohio. This comment was greeted with several nods.

Vanderbilt stood up at the podium, his legs feeling normal once again, "Indeed I do remember, but as I'm sure we can all agree, that was no fault of these states. We are all that's left of the Old Union. We did not secede, unlike the others, but rather we have remained together, because we know for a fact that we are stronger together. We know that we need each other, as a baby needs its mother, or a man needs a woman. We need one another. I know that. Clearly you all here know it. And back in 1776, those at the convention also knew it. Benjamin Franklin had his famous "Join or Die" image, calling for unity among the colonies."

"Excuse me, but what does this have to do with adopting the founding document of a failed state?" asked a delegate from New Hampshire.

"The United States was- is not a failed state. Not so long as we remain together," he declared. He began to move about the room with his distinctive walk, a sort of saunter with a slight limp. "The only way the United States fails is if we fail to unite." Delegates around the room nodded their heads and muttered tacit agreement. "That is why I have proposed adopting the United States Constitution - with some amendments - as our founding document. The government it established lasted nearly 200 years, and if not for a few regions seceding, it could have lasted a thousand.

"The amendments I propose are fairly simple. Ban segregation and grant equal rights," this was met with harsh boos from the Virginia and Maryland delegations, where segregation is still the norm, "include a clause granting the federal government the right to establish a welfare program for the greater good of the nation," this was met with many nods; no one could really disagree with a federal program to promote the welfare of the nation, especially after the last two decades of depression, war, and secession, "and equal rights for women," this was also met with several nods, as women were becoming more and more important to the general welfare of the world.

After returning to his desk, he allowed other members of the quasi-congress to speak. Some of them ridiculed him, but for the most part they praised his ideas. He sat at his desk, boiling in the un-air-conditioned room in the August heat, saying nothing, revealing nothing, and yet applauding each time someone finished speaking their piece. After seven hours, he decided to put it to a vote.

"Now we shall vote on Congressional Bill No. 1: the constitution of the American Commonwealth. The proposal is the original US constitution, plus the three aforementioned amendments, is this correct?"

"It is correct, your honor," said a man from Pennsylvania, who was essentially the number two of the convention, almost as well-respected as Mr. Vanderbilt.

"Very well then. All those in favor?" He began counting. 3/4 from Maine. 4/4 from Massachusetts. 3/4 from New York. 4/4 from New Jersey. 2/4 from New Hampshire. 1/4 from Vermont. 4/4 from Rhode Island. 4/4 from Connecticut. 2/4 from Pennsylvania. 2/4 from Delaware. 1/4 from Maryland. 1/4 from Virginia. And 3/4 from Ohio. 34 votes in favor. "Those opposed?" 1/4 from Maine. 1/4 from New York. 1/4 from New Hampshire. 3/4 from Vermont. 2/4 from Pennsylvania. 2/4 from Delaware. 2/4 from Maryland. 3/4 from Virginia. 1/4 from Ohio. 16 votes opposed. "And two abstentions. Motion passes. Our founding document shall be the US Constitution, with the amendments of guaranteed equal rights and equal opportunity," he banged his gavel, ending the session.

For those in favor, the convention had been a massive success. Not only did they get what they wanted in a constitution, but the democratic process had proven once again that it could function. This was a big, big step. For those opposed, they may not have gotten everything they wanted, but they still hailed the success of the democratic process. They agreed that it was excellent that the process had worked. Even for those abstaining, those who refused to even take part in the vote, the success of a democratic vote and no ensuing violence was a step in the right direction, even if they did not agree with the results.
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Mergerberger

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Re: A More Perfect Union

Post by Mergerberger on Wed Aug 03, 2016 1:34 am



Declaration of Independence of the Commonwealth of America

When in the Course of human events, it becomes necessary for one people to affirm the political bands which have connected them with one another, and to assume among the powers of the earth, the separate and equal station to which the Laws of Nature and of Nature's God entitle them, a decent respect to the opinions of mankind requires that they should declare the causes which impel them to the congregation.

We hold these truths to be self-evident that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their creator with certain unalienable rights, and among these are life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. That to secure these rights, governments are instituted among men, deriving their power from the consent of the governed. That should several States come together as one, it is their right to form a single nation. That this new government should make the rights to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness its primary goals, accomplishing them in whatever way the elected representatives of this Republic may see fit. That it is the duty of the government to make a better world for the people it governs, and that it is the responsibility of the government to provide for its people.

In recent years we have seen the collapse of many great nations. From the British Empire to the German Empire, from the Soviet Empire to the Japanese Empire. From Canada to the United States. Yet here we stand - the American Commonwealth - as a beacon of law, justice, and democracy. We are the successor state to the old United States of America. We are that shining city on a hill. We will pick up the torch of democracy from the dead United States and carry it on to Judgement Day.

We, therefore, the Representatives of the Commonwealth of America, in General Congress, Assembled, appealing to the Supreme Judge of the world for the rectitude of our intentions, do, in the Name, and by Authority of the good People of these Colonies, solemnly publish and declare, That these United Solonies are, and of Right ought to be Free and Independent States; that they are Absolved from all Allegiance to any other State, and that all political connection between them and all other States, is and ought to be totally dissolved; and that as Free and Independent States, they have full Power to levy War, conclude Peace, contract Alliances, establish Commerce, and to do all other Acts and Things which Independent States may of right do. And for the support of this Declaration, with a firm reliance on the protection of divine Providence, we mutually pledge to each other our Lives, our Fortunes and our sacred Honor.
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Re: A More Perfect Union

Post by Luxa on Wed Aug 03, 2016 5:49 am

The United Commonwealth of Britain sends its congratulations at the resurgence of a unified government in the former United States. I would like to ask permission for a meeting in your capital. I would like to revive the ties between the British and the Americans. We have much to discuss.

Lord Protector Coriolanus Snow of the United Commonwealth of Britain
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Re: A More Perfect Union

Post by Mergerberger on Thu Aug 04, 2016 8:12 am

Lord Protector Snow,

These terms are acceptable. We will make arrangements for your arrival, giving you the privilege of a full State visit. We shall dine on only the finest foods, enjoy the finest entertainment, and you shall have only the best of accommodations. Indeed we have much to discuss.

~ Numani Dickinson, Secretary of State
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Re: A More Perfect Union

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